One potato per serving

Campfire at the ember stage

Cooking time will vary with the size of the potato

 

Ingredients:

Select method and refer to instructions for ingredients.

Seasonings: Butter, salt, pepper, grated cheese, sour cream, Greek yogurt, skittled bacon, chopped chives and your personal favorite.

 

Method 1:

Wash each potato.

 

Poke each potato all over with a fork.

 

Bury the potatoes in the hot coals.

 

Allow to cook for 30 to 60 minutes or until soft inside when squeezed.

 

Cook’s Note: The skin of the potato may be charred and hard. It is therefore suggested that the cooked potato be cut lengthwise in half and the soft interior removed before seasoning with butter, salt and pepper. If you prefer, the seasonings can be placed directly in the halved potato and the potato then eaten out of the hard shell.

 

Method 2:

Wash each potato.

 

Poke each potato all over with a fork.

 

Smear each potato with 1 tablespoon of butter, then double wrap in aluminum foil.

 

Bury the potatoes in the hot coals.

 

Allow to cook for 30 to 60 minutes or until soft when squeezed.

 

Unwrap, cut in half lengthwise and serve with seasonings.

 

 

Method 3:

Wash each large baking potato.

 

Cut slices about an inch wide down the length of each potato. Be careful not to cut the slice all the way through. The cuts should be deep enough to allow the potatoes to open like an accordion.

 

Fry ½ slice of bacon for each slit in each potato until semi-crisp.

 

Thinly slice a sweet onion, one slice for each slit in each potato.

 

Prepare a thin pat of butter for each slit in each potato.

 

Place each potato on a piece of aluminum foil large enough to easily cover the entire potato.

 

Place a slice of bacon, slice of onion and pat of butter in each cut in each potato.

 

Close the aluminum foil around the potato.

 

Make a well in the embers. Place potatoes in the well. Cover with a mound of embers.

 

Cook from 30 to 60 minutes. Potatoes are done when the interior is soft. Test by squeezing. Carefully remove from ashes, unwrap, slice lengthwise and serve with seasonings.

 

Cook’s Note: Extra potatoes are great the next morning, fried.

 

Historical Note: Tin foil was available as of 1877. Tin foil tends to leave food with a tinny taste. Therefore, to improve the final product, it is suggested that aluminum foil be substituted. There are some advantages to living now.